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FY 2010 NIFA Fellowships

Post-Doctoral Fellowships

Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Ariz., $130,000 - This project seeks to link research on forest fire ecology with educational and extension activities to assist the Hualapai Tribe (Arizona) in adapting and managing forest ecosystems on their lands in the changing environment of the coming decades.

University of California, Berkeley, Calif., $130,000 - This proposal aims to characterize interactions between the genes required for acquisition of cell identity in the maize leaf in order to optimize yield and nutritional quality.

University of California, Berkeley, Calif., $130,000 – This project will develop novel mechanisms of engineering resistance and new varieties of cassava resistant to cassava bacterial blight disease.

University of California, San Diego, Calif., $130,000 – This project will research how the circadian clock controls regulation of abiotic stress signals, how these signals are integrated into the growth and developmental programming of the rice plant and how these signals impact yield under stress conditions.

Carnegie Institution, Stanford, Calif., $130,000 – This project will research algal lipid metabolism, which will help improve the engineering of algae with higher lipid accumulation for biofuel production.

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., $130,000 – This project will work to improve the safety and post-harvest quality of potatoes by reducing the glycoalkaoids level, which serve a protective function in plants but are toxic to humans and can be toxic when consumed in high amounts

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., $130,000 – This project will provide a foundation of knowledge about plant characteristics that are important to promoting beneficial microbial activities in soil, which could be incorporated into crop variety development.

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., $130,000 – This project will define the character of the long bone lesions and the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lesion development in fetuses persistently infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus.

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., $130,000 – This project will study whether phytodetector technology can be used to detect Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli molecules.

Yale University, New Haven, Conn., $130,000 – This project will research the functional roles of bacterial endosymbionts in their sap-sucking insect hosts and explain how both partners interact with one another at a molecular level.

University of Delaware, Lewes, Del., $130,000 – This project will establish a model system for the production of high quality lipids that is coupled to the bioremediation of carbon dioxide and nitric oxide from industrial pollution sources.

University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., $130,000 – This project will test simple environmental treatments to improve the sterile insect technique, which is used to control the cactus moth pest.

Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, Fla., $130,000 – This project will develop land-based sustainable production methods for a high-value marine fish to expand the U.S. marine aquaculture industry and provide a healthy and sustainable source of seafood.

Emory University, Atlanta, Ga., $130,000 - The goal of this project is to identify the routes of microbial contamination in produce on farms and packing sheds and then work with farmers on effective solutions to minimize contamination.

Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, $130,000 – This project will determine if epigenetic markers (which play a role in diabetes, obesity, skeletal muscle growth and development) are important in livestock genetic selection schemes to improve beef nutrient content.

Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, $130,000 – This project will research how viruses in the Carmovirus, Panicovirus and Umbravirus genera break through natural recessive resistance genes to effectively parasitize the plant host.

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La., $130,000 – This project will investigate the role of bacterial secretions in the development of enteric septicemia, a devastating catfish disease.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., $130,000 - This project aims to accelerate the development of cellulosic biofuels by applying powerful genomic and biochemical tools towards the discovery of novel cellulose-degrading enzymes that originate from fibrolytic anaerobic fungi.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., $130,000 – This project will research the biological mechanism adapted by Listeria to persist in food processing and storage conditions normally inhospitable to microorganisms.

University of Montana, Missoula, Mont., $130,000 – This project will study the structure and function of the European corn borer sex pheromone receptors.

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $130,000 – This project will determine the specific role of raffinose family oligosaccharides in phloem loading in poplar, which could lead to higher growth rates and biomass accumulation.

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $130,000 – This project will work to determine the mechanism by which food allergens develop, in order to develop strategies to stop the process.

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. $130,000 - This project will develop a mathematical model that will explain endemic persistence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), and infection within dairy herds. The model will be used to evaluate cost-effective MAP control strategies.

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $130,000 – This project will develop rapid identification systems for cold-thriving bacteria in order to reduce food spoilage.

Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, N.Y., $130,000 – This project will identify the mechanisms by which populations of western corn rootworm (WCR) have become resistant to a Bt toxin and to identify genes contributing to resistance in WCR.

Duke University, Durham, N.C., $130,000 - The overarching goal of this project is to understand how the root systems of crop plants develop, particularly in response to environmental pressures.

North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., $130,000 - The project will determine the possible mechanisms that dietary supplements, particularly melatonin, play in modifying placental function and fetal development in sheep in order to improve birth weight.

Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa., $130,000 – This project will research how plant proteins influence the plant’s ability to intake nitrogen from the soil in an effort to decrease costly nitrogen inputs by producers.

Clemson University, Clemson, S.C., $130,000 - The goal of this project is to provide cotton producers and consultants with effective tools to manage stink bugs within the minimal-insecticide-use production systems made possible by the relatively recent introduction of B.t. varieties.

University of Texas, Austin, Texas, $130,000 – This project will research the genetic basis of drought and heat stress response in grass crops in order to develop breeding strategies that optimize combinations of desirable agricultural traits, particularly in wheat.

University of Texas, Austin, Texas, $130,000 – This project will research the genetics of how switchgrass copes with environmental stresses.

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, $130,000 – This project will identify changes in the plasma proteome that may lead to the development of Equine laminitis, a disease that costs U.S. producers $13 million annually.

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, $130,000 – This project will identify the genomic regions in broiler chickens that are resistant to the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, $130,000 – This project will identify key regulators of iron and zinc accumulation and bioavailability in rice grain in order to grow more nutritional cultivars of rice.

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., $130,000 – This project will research how the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus survives in the pig to create better ways to treat and possibly eradicate the disease.

Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., $130,000 – This project will research how household food inventory dynamics affects dietary choices and consequent health outcomes.

Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., $130,000 – This project will investigate whether reduced-input farming can reverse harmful effects of climate variability on biological control.

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisc., $130,000 - The goal of this project is to evaluate the effects of climate variability on control of a common pest, pea aphids, by natural enemies in alfalfa Medicago sativa.

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisc., $130,000 – This project will develop a tractable model for microbial oil production and uncover mechanisms that direct the genetic engineering of microbes for increased yield of fatty acid-derived biofuels.

 

Predoctoral Fellowships

University of California, Berkeley, Calif., $75,000 – This project will research the role of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of new diseases to help prevent future crop failure and famine resulting from pathogenic infections.

Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., $75,000 - The goal of this research project is to understand how the pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pathovar vesicatoria, causes bacterial spot disease, a commercially important disease of tomato and pepper.

Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., $75,000 - The goal of this project is to improve the safety of food products supplied to U.S. markets from international sources like China by investigating key safety and quality attributes recognized by U.S. consumers and accepted by Chinese producers.

Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, $40,000 - This project aims to enhance water quality in regions impacted by agricultural drainage by improving the performance and understanding of denitrification bioreactors, one of the newest technologies for practical edge-of-field nitrate removal.

University of Maine, Bangor, Orono, $75,000 - The purpose of this project is to determine the relative economic values of wild bee pollinators and commercial honeybees in lowbush blueberry production for individual Maine farms.

Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich., $75,000 - This project seeks to better understand the interaction between the pathogen Ps. cubensis and cucumber and develop materials for an outreach and education program for stakeholders such as cucumber growers and processors.

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., $75,000 - This project aims to study how the GH3 proteins play in a plant’s ability to detect and respond to a wide range of different environmental cues to maximize survival and reproduction.

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $75,000 – This project will research the methods cellulases use in breaking down sugar molecules in the cell wall of plants, an important process in the production of cellulosic bioenergy.

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C., $75,000 – This project will research the mechanisms involved in root-knot nematodes parasitism to develop new disease management methods.

Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa., $75,000 - This project will explore the effects of a common plant pathogen, Cucumber mosaic virus, on features of its host plants that influence key interactions with insect disease vectors, such as aphids.

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., $75,000 – This project will use structural approaches to address basic research questions regarding crop exploitation by parasitic plants, particularly Striga and Orobanche.