Animal health and production and animal products

VetLink Mobile App at Prairie View A&M: Agricultural Technology Breaking Through Barriers

VetLink is a mobile goat application developed by Dr. Paul Johnson, a research scientist in Prairie View A&M University’s Cooperative Agricultural Research Center (CARC).

Natural Parasite Management Improves Sustainability and Profitability of Small Ruminant Production

Fort Valley State University’s (FVSU) research and outreach on the tannin-containing legume sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) as a natural alternative to ineffective anthelmintic drugs has shown improved sustainability and profitability of small ruminant production systems in the United States.

University of Tennessee Extension Beef Cattle Programs

Challenges facing the beef cattle industry in Tennessee range from the adoption of very basic management practices to complicated global market drivers that affect input costs.

Students Trained in Seafood Safety

Specially trained seafood handlers will eliminate risk of contamination or hazards that could cause illness.

Cutting through the Barriers of Local Meat Sales for Virginia’s Small Farmers

When a Virginia sheep farmer told small ruminant scientist Dr. Dahlia O’Brien that transporting his livestock to quality, inspected slaughter facilities stressed the animals and caused measurable decreases in meat quality, she took action.

Helping West Virginia’s Communities Succeed

In West Virginia, over one million acres of land are unable to be farmed due to improper soils and flood-prone locations.

Bees and Trees

A University of Kentucky (UK) entomology doctoral student, Bernadette Mach, has developed a list of bee-friendly trees and shrubs for the Ohio Valley region. The list can help homeowners find the right plants for their yards to help conserve bees.

A Multistate Hive Mind of Research

Bees provide essential pollination for many of the nut, berry, fruit, vegetable, and seed crops grown in the U.S. To supplement wild bee pollination, farmers often rent managed honey bee colonies. Demand is skyrocketing, but catastrophic die-offs are threatening the supply of healthy honey bee colonies.

Almonds, Wildflowers, Bees, Oh My!

Some almond growers have started planting wildflowers on the edges of managed fields as a way to help bees do their jobs in the face of pollinator pressures. There are, however concerns that the wildflowers may pull valuable pollination services away from the almond crops. New research reveals that almond growers can put this particular concern aside.

What Wild Bees Need

A new national assessment estimates that wild bees declined in 23 percent of the contiguous United States between 2008 and 2013. The team of Project ICP researchers, led by Insu Koh at the University of Vermont, found that the decline was generally associated with conversion of natural habitats to row crops. Areas of intense agriculture (e.g., the Midwest Corn Belt and the Central Valley of California) have among the lowest levels of predicted wild bee abundance.